5

Healthy Lifestyle Programme:

The Healthy Lifestyles programme aims to deliver appropriate evidence-based health interventions to ensure optimum health focusing on our target audience young people between the ages of 10-24. These interventions focus on the key health priorities for the country and globally that impact on health among young people in South Africa.

Through our healthy lifestyle programme we employ modular programmes; Health4Life and LivingMyLife and face to face interventions that seek to address various focus areas that are important to the wellbeing of young people.

Read more
The Health4Life programme covers the following themes:
  • Sexual Reproductive health and rights
  • HIV and AIDS & TB
  • STIs
  • Teen Pregnancy
  • Drug and substance abuse
  • Mental Health
  • Violence and Unintentional Injuries
  • Nutrition
  • Menstrual health and hygiene

LoveLife’s Born Free Dialogues (intergenerational dialogues), Youth Health Festivals and groundBREAKERs at Adolescent and Youth Friendly Facilities (AYFS) form part of interventions that cover the core themes and also focus on other drivers that fuel HIV infections in South Africa such as:

  • Gender Based Violence and intimate partner violence
  • Age-disparate sexual relationships
  • Transactional sexual relationships
  • Low service uptake and HIV testing among young people
Our Healthy Lifestyle activities are as follows:

Youth Health Festivals and Events

loveLife’s dedicated teams of groundBREAKERs and mpintshis present our healthy sexuality and positive lifestyle programmes in a fun and engaging manner through festivals and events, involving health talks, sport, dance, drama and debate. loveLife creates demand for services among youth through interactions with youth, therefore, as a way of bringing services to the people, the provision of services such as HIV testing, TB screening, blood pressure testing, etc. through various partners we work with is critical at these events.

Born Free Dialogues

LoveLife’s Born Free Dialogues (intergenerational dialogues), Youth Health Festivals and Adolescent and Youth Friendly Facilities (AYFS) form part of interventions that focus on other drivers that fuel HIV infections in South Africa such as:

  • Gender-Based Violence and intimate partner violence
  • Age-disparate sexual relationships
  • Transactional sexual relationships
  • Low service uptake and HIV testing among young people
5

Active Lifestyles Programme:

The Active Lifestyles package is loveLife’s sport, recreation, arts and culture programme which has been designed to facilitate access to sport and recreation for young people for health and physical activity promotion in order to reduce vulnerability towards non-communicable diseases NCD’s in later years. The programme provides an opportunity to positively engage young people on social and behaviour change (SBCC) initiatives through sport and recreation. Recreation as a medium for SBCC has the potential to reduce risk behaviour by providing short and long term physical and mental health benefits.

Read more

The programme is implemented by loveLife groundBREAKERs across the country. The outcomes of the programme are increased physical fitness and activity that is maintained in the long term, young people making better health choices and sexual choices as well as increased appraisement of differences and respect.

We also specifically target adults (coaches, teachers, parents) to assist with sustaining these changes in their daily engagements with their athletes and youth participants in general. These community coaches, parents and teachers are known as adult allies. Coaches are of particular importance to us because of the frequent and consistent access they have with young people who are already participating in sports. We see this access as an opportunity for coaches to play an important role in promoting healthy lifestyles among their teams. In order to empower coaches to communicate new information on NCDs and HIV among athletes and enable them to positively influence behaviour change, we train them on a holistic coaching programme called Coach4Life. Through this programme, participants (adult allies) are developed as life coaches, who can adequately instil positive values on healthy living both in terms of taking care of your body and in staying Healthy. We train adult allies to see themselves as role models to the young sports people. The manner in which coaches conduct their personal lives; how they eat, how they train and how they carry themselves whether they are HIV positive or not is crucial to the young players, who look up to them for guidance. We also work with coaches as mentors. If trained and supported well, coaches can provide guidance to the team members who seek their support around NCDs and HIV. Coaches can also provide information on where, how and when to access specific services including accessing condoms, seeking psychosocial support, testing for STIs and others.

 We also enlist the support of sports stars who have made names for themselves in their communities and country across all sporting codes. We understand the power of their celebrated status and the influence they have on young athletes. We particularly seek to partner with positive influencers who can speak comfortably about healthy living and live up to the values and behaviours we seek to instil. These celebrated sportsmen and women are provided with a basic loveLife training that orients them to the work we do and the change we want to see among youth and we allow them to convey these messages in their own way at events that reach up to thousands of young people.

loveLife groundBREAKERs also support all Department of Sport, Arts and Culture events with Edutainment where health, wellbeing and nutrition is discussed with athletes and spectators on the day through motivational talks, fun activities, Mobile Y-Centre (MYC) activations, song and dance. The partnership with the department that allows loveLife messaging to be shared at sport and recreation events allows loveLife to have access to a large audience of young people at one time due to the popularity of sport events but also it allows for sport to play an important role in social change and youth leadership development.

    5

    Youth Leadership Development Programme

    As loveLife defines health as the complete wellbeing of a person; absent of disease, mentally sound and socially grounded, Youth Leadership Development is a critical pillar in the work that we do with young people. The loveLife 3C construct where we want to see young people Complete, Creative and Connected comes to play in the YLD pillar of loveLife. We realise that encouraging young people to steer away from harmful behaviours that affect their physical health without ensuring that they receive psychosocial support as well as training and access to opportunities is only going half the distance in ensuring that young people are healthy and succeed in life.

    Read more

    The programme is implemented by loveLife groundBREAKERs across the country. The outcomes of the programme are increased physical fitness and activity that is maintained in the long term, young people making better health choices and sexual choices as well as increased appraisement of differences and respect.

    We also specifically target adults (coaches, teachers, parents) to assist with sustaining these changes in their daily engagements with their athletes and youth participants in general. These community coaches, parents and teachers are known as adult allies. Coaches are of particular importance to us because of the frequent and consistent access they have with young people who are already participating in sports. We see this access as an opportunity for coaches to play an important role in promoting healthy lifestyles among their teams. In order to empower coaches to communicate new information on NCDs and HIV among athletes and enable them to positively influence behaviour change, we train them on a holistic coaching programme called Coach4Life. Through this programme, participants (adult allies) are developed as life coaches, who can adequately instil positive values on healthy living both in terms of taking care of your body and in staying Healthy. We train adult allies to see themselves as role models to the young sports people. The manner in which coaches conduct their personal lives; how they eat, how they train and how they carry themselves whether they are HIV positive or not is crucial to the young players, who look up to them for guidance. We also work with coaches as mentors. If trained and supported well, coaches can provide guidance to the team members who seek their support around NCDs and HIV. Coaches can also provide information on where, how and when to access specific services including accessing condoms, seeking psychosocial support, testing for STIs and others.

     We also enlist the support of sports stars who have made names for themselves in their communities and country across all sporting codes. We understand the power of their celebrated status and the influence they have on young athletes. We particularly seek to partner with positive influencers who can speak comfortably about healthy living and live up to the values and behaviours we seek to instil. These celebrated sportsmen and women are provided with a basic loveLife training that orients them to the work we do and the change we want to see among youth and we allow them to convey these messages in their own way at events that reach up to thousands of young people.

    loveLife groundBREAKERs also support all Department of Sport, Arts and Culture events with Edutainment where health, wellbeing and nutrition is discussed with athletes and spectators on the day through motivational talks, fun activities, Mobile Y-Centre (MYC) activations, song and dance. The partnership with the department that allows loveLife messaging to be shared at sport and recreation events allows loveLife to have access to a large audience of young people at one time due to the popularity of sport events but also it allows for sport to play an important role in social change and youth leadership development.

    The Boy-Child Program

    Country Situational Analysis – Background

    Violence overall is a frighteningly ordinary part of life for many men and boys and deaths from violence predominantly affect young adult males in South Africa and other parts of the world (1). Globally, males account for 82 percent of all homicide victims, and young men aged 15-29 are victims of homicide at a rate that is six times greater than the rate of homicide deaths for young women in the same age group (1). Men and boys are more likely to experience or be a perpetrator of violence in adolescence and early adulthood than at any other time. This culture of violence also affects youth’s attitudes that justify and normalize it. This “normalization” of violence is established early on for many boys and young men in some parts of the world. 

    Read more

    Engaging men and boys in supporting full equality for women and girls is critical as it also positively impacts the lives of men and boys themselves. It is essential to engage adolescent boys and young men in gender equality because norms around what it means to be a man often cause harm to women and girls, more specifically, inequalities in power and privilege between men and women, and between boys and girls, emerge from widely accepted gender norms that place men, in general, in a dominant position compared to women in the public and private spheres.

    In the context of sexual and reproductive health and rights, boys and men perpetrate sexual violence and exploitation against girls and women outside of intimate partnerships. In many cultures boys grow up and are often socialized to ascribe to rigid definitions of emotion repressing, violent, misogynistic, and heteronormative manhood. This may include taking risks that can harm their own and others’ health, such as engaging in unsafe sex and substance abuse, using violence against other men and boys to resolve conflict, and hiding “un-masculine” emotions such as pain, fear, and sadness. 

    In South African one rape incidence is reported every 36 seconds, which translates to 100 rape incidences reported every hour and approximately 2400 women raped every day. This means approximately 74 400 rape incidences are reported in SA every month. In terms of femicide, United Nations report suggest that more than 35% of all murders of women globally are reported to be committed by intimate partners. The rate of murders in South Africa is estimated at 25 per 100 000 females and about 8.8 per 100 000 murders are attributed to intimate partner’s violence (1). 

    Aim of the Boy- Child Program

    loveLife has, over the years, identified a gap in the initiatives and interventions that aimed at reducing violence. One of the gaps has been to focus on gender based violence as opposed to the bigger problem of violence. Another gap has been the reactionary nature of the initiatives with a focus on victim-empowerment with very few organisations that are focusing on prevention of violence in the first place.

     The Boy Child campaign aims to increase community responsiveness to issues affecting boys and young men in order to reduce all forms of violence (gender based violence, intimate partner violence, sexual violence, violence against members of the LGBTIQ community, violence against other boys and suicide), unequal power relations, sexual coercion, teenage pregnancy and HIV risks amongst adolescent youth and young men through community mobilization and strong service provision and linkages. The program is also intended to empower boys and young men to understand their holistic health and be an integral part of the solution to the violence to which they are the majority of victims and perpetrators. Together, we can raise a different generation of men. 

    References.

    1. Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). Global AIDS Update – 2016. Geneva: UNAIDS, 2016. http://www.unaids.org/en/resources/documents/2016/Global-AIDS-update-2016 (accessed 2 November 2016).
    5

    Psychosocial Support Services:

    Vodacom: *140*0833231023# // MTN: *121*0833231023# // Cell C: *111*0833231023# // Telkom: *140*0833231023#

    1.Psychosocial Support (PSS)

    LoveLife’s youth focused psychosocial support programme is delivered by counsellors through the loveLife Contact Centre and also various media platforms. Services are offered for free and are easily accessible to young people. Life’s challenges and difficulties can leave you feeling powerless, hopeless and with a sense of no choice. As a young person these are amplified when you feel there is no support to help navigate life’s difficulties and challenges and the main goal of the programme is to assist young people and parents to build resilience in navigating through life in relation to sexual reproductive health issues and family challenges.

    Read more

    By sending a PLZ call to 0835231023 young people and parents to young people as well as teachers, coaches and other people who interact with young people have access to a Psychosocial Support programme designed to promote emotional wellbeing of young people, through telephonic and text- based counselling to young people and parents. The services offered through the contact centre are linked to and support on the ground programme activities implemented by groundBREAKERs nationally and through gB referrals to the contact centre people needing assistance are linked to loveLife Y-Centres, AYFS clinics or other relevant organisations in their community as part of a multifaceted Psychosocial Support approach.

    Psychological health contributes to the positive functioning of youth focusing on personal growth and development of one’s full potential. It promotes a sense of autonomy, competence, self-acceptance, positive relations with others, belonging and purpose. The support programme promotes mental functioning at a higher level of behavioural and emotional adjustment.

    Catch #AskloveLife every Wednesday,  1:30-2:30pm