Studies, Surveys And Reports

Call Centre Report 2013

loveLife has two national toll-free helplines, the Youth Line and Parent Line, which were established in 2000 to provide comprehensive reproductive health information and counselling services for both adolescents and parents/guardians. loveLife’s national Call Centre also aims to promote open discussion around sex and sexuality among adolescents and parents, increase the uptake of adolescent and youth friendly health services and link young people to loveLife programmes.

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Talking Points

The loveLife Impact Assessment Study 2011 was a collaborative project between loveLife and the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC). The study was overseen by Karl Peltzer, who also led the quantitative study team including Shandir Ramlagan, Motlatso Mlambo, Julia Louw, Gugu Mchunu, Khangelani Zuma, Lebogang Seutlwadi, Bomkazi Tutshana, Gladys Matseke, Witness Chirinda, Peter Njuho and Mpho Satekge.

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Europawärts Evaluation

Europawärts is a youth leadership programme, carried out by loveLife in conjunction with GIZ, the German International Cooperation. Designed as an exchange programme, Europawarts gives young South Africans, including alumni groundBREAKERs (peer motivators and community mobilisers), the opportunity to gain skills and experience by volunteering for various NGOs in Germany.

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South African national HIV prevalence, incidence, behaviour and communication survey, 2008

South Africa has the largest burden of HIV/Aids and is currently implementing the largest antiretroviral treatment (ART) programme in the world. It is therefore fitting that South Africa is the first in the world to conduct three repeated national HIV population-based surveys to help monitor our response as a nation to the HIV/Aids epidemic. This report is the third in a time series of population-based HIV seroprevalence surveys which started in 2002 and were repeated in 2005 and again in 2008.

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An assessment of the self-reported impact of the loveLife groundBREAKER Programme 2001 – 2005

One of the loveLife campaign’s strongest assets is its young leaders called groundBREAKERS (gBs). To date, over 7,500, 18 to 25-year-old groundBREAKERS have graduated from the year-long programme as community leaders in HIV prevention and a further 6,000 are expected to pass through the programme over the next five years. They are loveLife’s frontline workers implementing HIV/Aids and lifestyle education programmes throughout South Africa.

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Teenage pregnancy in Teenage pregnancy in South Africa: With a specific focus on school-going Learners, 2009, HSRC

The purpose of this study, which was commissioned by UNICEF, was to document, review and critically analyse literature on teenage pregnancy with a focus on school-going adolescents. The study also makes recommendations for interventions within the education system and other sectors.

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HIV and sexual behaviour among young South Africans: A national survey of 15-24 year olds

It is difficult to attribute the impact of loveLife as distinct from the effects of other national HIV prevention campaigns.For this reason, there are two main objectives of this national evaluation: the first objective is to identify trends in HIV infection and related determinants of infection among young people. The second objective is to try and gauge the relative impact of loveLife on HIV and related risk behaviours.

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Counselling Youth by Mobile Phone: A South African loveLife HIV Prevention Programme

loveLife runs a Contact Centre offering psycho-social counselling by phone and internet. This report focuses on Germany’s support for measures to ensure counselling of best possible quality to as many people as possible. The ultimate aim is to prevent HIV and promote sexual and reproductive health and general well-being among South Africa’s adolescents and young adults.

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International Aids Conference Vienna – July 2010 report: Sharing the experience

Sharing the experiences of the first 10 years of loveLife and making recommendations for HIV prevention among younng people.

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A gauge of HIV prevention in South Africa 2008

As the national response to HIV/Aids is accelerated over the next three years, we need a clear, yet comprehensive gauge of progress in HIV prevention. We need to know what to expect if our interventions are successful. We need to know what the sticking points are as well as where progress is being made fast. And we need to know whether our interventions reach enough people with sufficient quality and intensity to make an impact.

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A gauge of HIV prevention in South Africa 2009 in brief

The prevalence of HIV infection in the total population of South Africa has stabilised at about 11%. Based on the mid-year population projections by Statistics South Africa for 2009, this means that about 5.35 million people are living with HIV.

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The 2001 national survey of South African youth

South African teenagers name HIV/Aids as the top concern facing young South Africans today. However, despite this concern about HIV for South African youth overall, the large majority of youth believe that they personally are at very low or no risk for infection.

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HIV and sexual behaviour among young South Africans: A national survey of 15-24 year olds

During the period 1994 to 2001, there has been an exponential growth of HIV infections in South Africa. This growth has been accompanied by greater visibility of the epidemic, especially owing to the increasing numbers of AIDS cases and deaths. Experts agree that South Africa now faces one of the world’s most severe HIV/Aids epidemics.

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MYMsta presentation: 2010 Health Summit in Washington, USA, November 2010

MYMsta is a mobile social network, built using WAP technology. Launched in June 2008. Was the first Mobile Social Network in the world dedicated to youth empowerment and HIV prevention

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A special report looking back at 30 years of HIV/Aids to find the best ways forward

The HIV/Aids debacle will always be a stain on our hard fought democracy. I can remember the discussions in COSATU in the mid-eighties when we began to see the impact of HIV/Aids as a result of the brutal migrant labour apartheid policy, which destroyed the social fabric of our country by tearing men from their families and housing them in dehumanising conditions in hostels.

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Youth Conference Report 2008 – HIV prevention for young people: Moving from what-to-change to want-to-change strategies

Sub-Saharan Africa continues to suffer from the highest rates of HIV infection in the world. According to UNAIDS, “In 2007, this sub region accounted for almost a third (32%) of all new HIV infections and Aids-related deaths globally”.1 Furthermore, women have been disproportionately affected by HIV, “with 75 percent of HIV-positive 15 to 25 year olds in sub-Saharan Africa being female”.2 Young people have also been shown to be especially vulnerable to infection. Epidemiological studies in South Africa, for example, show that the incidence of HIV peaks in young people aged between 15 and 24.

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Young people’s sexual health in South Africa: HIV prevalence and sexual behaviors from a nationally representative household survey

Young people in sub-Saharan Africa continue to be one of the populations at greatest risk of HIV infection, particularly young women. Based on the 2003 South African antenatal clinic survey, HIV prevalence among 15–19-year-old women appears to be stabilising at around 15% whereas in the 20–24-year-old age group the prevalence increased from 2002 levels to 30%.

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Youth Conference Report 2009 – Pushing the boundaries of HIV prevention: Looking back and moving forward

The last 10 years of loveLife’s existence have been challenging as well as rewarding. We couldn’t have chosen a better time to initiate such a major national HIV/Aids programme in Africa and most certainly, Southern Africa. 1999 was the year in which South Africa in particular was experiencing a spike in the mortality phase. While people were dying, the Mbeki administration was reluctant to address the HIV/Aids issue head on. loveLife, however, grabbed the bull by the horns. Against all odds, we are here to share our story – 10 years later. Let’s take an evolutionary journey of our strategy and approach to the campaign, including our controversial visual billboard creatives.

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HCT and youth: Issues, challenges and lessons learned

It is a well-known fact that South Africa has one of the largest HIV epidemics worldwide. The 2008 HSRC survey, South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence, Behaviour and Communication Survey 2008, found that 10.9% of the South African population aged 2+ years was HIV positive at the time of the survey. Among women between the ages of 25 and 29, one in three (32.7%) were found to be HIV positive. In reaction to these still alarming statistics, the South African government launched a massive HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) Campaign in April 2010 with the aim of testing 15 million individuals from 12 years and older by the end of June 2011.

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